Are Emoticons the Future of Language?

"In the digital age, we increasingly use written language in place of face to face chat or phone calls. But the advantages email, chat, and text give us in speed come with limitations in communicating emotional tone. Enter emoticons and emojis. Not just a playful supplement to language, these new tools allow for complexity in tone and emotion never before possible in written language, as well as provide new opportunities for creative expression. Rapidly spreading throughout culture, emoticons and emojis fill a void in written language that few realized we so desperately needed."

Featuring: 
Ben Zimmer, Linguist & Lexicographer http://benzimmer.com/
Mitchell Stephens, Prof. of Journalism, NYUhttp://journalism.nyu.edu/faculty/mit...
Fred Benenson, Creator of "Emoji Dick" http://www.emojidick.com/

The New IKEA BRÅKIG Collection

I was lucky enough to discover the New IKEA BRÅKIG Collection today a day after it was launched at IKEA, so I have just bought half of it before it sells out. It's just so gorgeous and is almost like a modern Festival of Britain collection.

"BRÅKIG (meaning rebellious) is the result of close cooperation between IKEA and the creative collective ArtRebels.The BRÅKIG collection is all about well-designed, functional furniture and interior design details that make no excuses. Quite the reverse. The collection comprises about thirty products and has everything from clever storage solutions and small sized furniture to textiles, china and wallpaper, not to mention new versions of several familiar friends. Influences from Danish design and a love of Copenhagen are shown in the choice of techniques, materials and design. Natural materials such as plywood and pine are coordinated with misty pastels and sharp, graphic designs." Source

Read article on the Art Rebels website here

The Dot and the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics

I loved this animation as a kid, it's still great now...

The Dot and the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics is a book written and illustrated by Norton Juster, first published by Random House in 1963. The story was inspired by Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, in which the protagonist visits a one-dimensional universe called Lineland, where women are dots and men are lines.

In 1965, famed animator Chuck Jones and the MGM Animation/Visual Arts studio adapted The Dot and the Line into a 10-minute animated short film for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, narrated by Robert MorleyThe Dot and the Line won the 1965 Academy Award for Animated Short Film. It was entered into the Short Film Palme d'Or competition at the 1966 Cannes Film Festival. (Source: Wikipedia)