Design Process: Experimental Jetset / Le Cent Quatre 2

Experimental Jetset explains the design process from initial requirements/workshop/clients likes & dislikes through to all the design elements in all their required scenarios - it's a really interesting look at a very intelligent & detailed design process that shows the amount of thought and iteration that goes into designing a graphic brand.

Also, download the final styleguide at the bottom of the page: "The final and complete graphic manual ('charte graphique'). It was developed in installments; every time a certain design or template was approved, we added it to the manual. Sometimes the city council rejected something, months after the directors had already approved it; in that case, we didn't remove the design from the manual, but just added another chapter, in which we negated the previous chapter. In that sense, it's a manual that really shows the development of the graphic identity; it shows not only the remaining, 'winning' parts, but also the rejected proposals, and the failures."

Which typeface are you? Fun personality analysis microsite / #Pentagram / #Typography

What typeface are you?
See http://www.pentagram.com/what-type-are-you/ (Password: Character)

Im Cooper Black Italic (pictured), rather pleased as is an old favourite of mine, nice... (thought it might turn out to be Helvetica?)

Better summary article on the project than I could cob together here: http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/cliff-kuang/design-innovation/your-personalit...
"If you've ever sat down with a type designer, what you quickly realize is that they rarely talk about fonts in purely aesthetic or even functional terms: They talk about assertiveness or calm or friendliness. In short, they talk about personality traits. It makes sense, then, that your personality could be translated into a typeface. And Pentragram has done just that, in this lovely microsite, What Type are You? (Password: Character) It takes you through four simple personality questions, guided by a faceless psychoanalyst. (The analyst's 1920s Bauhaus office setting is a witty touch.) After answering the questions, the analyst spits out one of 16 typefaces, and an explanation about the design and how it exemplifies the characteristics you laid out. There's even a bit of history about each, and a list you can see of who else had the same results. (For example, "Virginia Heffernan," which just might be The New York Times's TV critic, is Bifur.)"