Own Label, Sainsbury's Design Studio 1962-1977

"In 1962, when Peter Dixon joined the Sainsbury’s Design Studio, a remarkable revolution in packaging design began. The supermarket was developing its distinctive range of Own Label products, and Dixon’s designs for the line were revolutionary: simple, stripped down, creative, and completely different from what had gone before. Their striking modernity pushed the boundaries, reflecting a period full of optimism. They also helped build Sainsbury’s into a brand giant, the first real ‘super’ market of the time. This book examines and celebrates this paradigm shift that redefined packaging design, and led to the creation of some of the most original packaging ever seen." Source http://www.fuel-design.com/index.php?menu=3&pic=287&detail=1 

Via http://vintageposterblog.com/2011/10/10/refined-lard/ and http://creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2011/august/sainsburys-own-label-book

British GPO Posters | 1930-1960

"Design played a crucial role in promoting social progress and technological change across Britain between 1930 and 1960. The commercial poster reached cultural maturity during this period and became the most eloquent of the mass media. From the 1930s onwards the Post Office became a leader in the field of poster design, commissioning some of Britain's best artists and designers." http://www.postalheritage.org.uk/page/designsondelivery

Psychedelic 'Hapshash and the Coloured Coat' & 'Osiris' Posters

"Hapshash and the Coloured Coat, the 1960s design duo comprised of Michael English and Nigel Waymouth. The two artists, together with associate Martin Sharp, are indelibly associated with the London psychedelic scene of the late Sixties. Whereas Sharp’s posters were often loose and dramatically bold explosions of shape and colour, the Hapshash posters were more carefully controlled in their curating of disparate elements borrowed from Art Nouveau—especially Mucha and Beardsely—comic strips, Op Art, Pop art and fantasy illustration. Their work perfectly complemented the very distinctive atmosphere of the capital’s psychedelic scene which, for a couple of hectic years, saw an explosion of new bands (or old bands in new guises) fervently engaged in a lysergic exploration of Victoriana, childhood memories and frequent silliness. English and Waymouth’s graphics captured the London mood." Quoted from http://www.johncoulthart.com/feuilleton/2009/10/03/michael-english-1941–2009/

http://www.chickenonaunicycle.com/Europe%20Art.htm and http://www.whocollection.com/hapshash_&_osiris_posters.htm